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Tom’s Tutorials For Excel: Running a PowerPoint Presentation From Excel

Tom’s Tutorials For Excel: Running a PowerPoint Presentation From Excel

Download this Excel workbook that runs a PowerPoint presentation.
Download this accompanying PowerPoint presentation.

Here is how you can run a PowerPoint presentation from Excel, with the below macro named “PowerPointSlideshow”.

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Tom’s Tutorials For Excel: Importing an Access database table into Excel — a Quick Shortcut

Tom’s Tutorials For Excel: Importing an Access database table into Excel — a Quick Shortcut

Here’s a shortcut to manually import an Access database table into your spreadsheet. It’ll come with the alternating shaded rows and field header drop-down arrows, but it’s fast and easy. The first picture shows an access table just for example,

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Tom’s Tutorials For Excel: Showing Your Column Headers as Letters or Numbers

You can show your column headers as letters or numbers. Here’s how to change column headers depending on your preferred look.

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Tom’s Tutorials For Excel: Knowing Any Workbook’s Last Saved Date and Time

You can get the last saved date and time for any workbook whether it is open or closed. In Step 3, for demonstration purposes in the Immediate window, I preceded that line of code with the then-current date and time. In the following pictures, Book1 is the only workbook open in the Visual Basic Editor’s Project window.

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Tom’s Tutorials For Excel: Moving a Cell’s Lines of Text into Separate Columns

I previously posted this example showing how to enter separate lines of text into a single cell. This example shows how to move each line of a cell’s text into its own cell.

The first picture shows five cells in range A3:A7 that each have three lines of text for a person’s name,

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Tom’s Tutorials For Excel: Introduced in Version 2016, the “Tell me what you want to do” Field

Introduced in Excel 2016, you can click into the “Tell me what you want to do” field as shown in the picture, or press Alt+Q from your worksheet, to enter a topic for information. This is a fairly intuitive new tool, while saving the interim step of hitting the F1 key for help about a topic.

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Tom’s Tutorials For Excel: Introduced in Version 2016, the Multi-Select Icon for Pivot Table Slicers

Introduced in Excel 2016 is the Multi-Select icon for pivot table slicers, a welcome convenience to the heretofore requirement of pressing the Ctrl key to select multiple labels.
In the picture for example, I clicked the Multi-Select icon, then clicked to deselect the states of Arizona, Iowa, and Michigan from appearing in the pivot table’s Sum of Sales.

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Tom’s Tutorials For Excel: Summing a Range of Separate Pairs of Delimited Numbers

Here are two formula options to sum a range of cells, when each cell holds a delimiter (in this example, a hyphen character), and you want to separately sum the cells’ numbers to the left and right sides of the delimiter.
In the picture, the array formula in cell B14 that sums the San Francisco Giants’

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Tom’s Tutorials For Excel: Customizing the Status Bar

Tom’s Tutorials For Excel: Customizing the Status Bar
You can right-click the status bar for additional edit, formatting, and analysis options.
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The following picture shows a Before and After comparison of the additional information you can choose for the status bar to show. In this example,

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Tom’s Tutorials For Excel: Using a Formula to Transpose a Vertical Range Horizontally

Tom’s Tutorials For Excel: Using a Formula to Transpose a Vertical Range Horizontally
As the picture shows by example, you can horizontally transpose a vertical range at any cell outside the vertical range with the formula
=INDEX($A$2:$A$25,COLUMNS($A$2:A25))
Note the absolute and relative references.
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